Category: Voices & Views

Justin Lospoc

Justin Lospoc is a 34-year-old Liberal Arts major from Waipahu. He plans to start Respiratory Therapy classes next semester.

Lospoc worked with respiratory specialists while serving as a corpsman in the U.S. Navy.

“It just intrigues me that breathing is essential to life, and I want to know how the human lungs work,” he said.

After graduation, Lospoc wishes to move to Washington or Oregon after graduation to be closer to snow, but if he can find a job in the respiratory field here in Oʻahu, he will stay.  

In his free time, Lospoc enjoys snowboarding, body boarding, and fishing.

Bryan Suechting

Bryan Suechting is a 33-year-old from Folsom, Calif., and is currently working on completing the science courses needed to get into a science based-master’s program.

Suechting has a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from UCLA, and due to not being able to market the degree well, was unable to find a career in the field. For the past two years Bryan has been working as a bartender at Yard House in Waikiki. During that time he learned how to brew beer and has won two first-place and second-place medals. 

Bryan fell in love with Hawaiʻi after visiting his brother in 2017. The decision to move to Oʻahu was based on finding a location that would calm the symptoms of eczema, and where the brewery market was up and coming.

“In the week and a half I was here, my eczema cleared up, it was the humidity. I wanted to open a brewery with my brother, but after a year I decided not to and go back to school,” he said. 

Suechting’s advice for students is to make connections and get as much hands-on experience as possible.

“I made the mistake of not making connections my first time through college,” he said. “I just thought that If I got good grades and put that on a resume it would get me a job. That was not the case. Connections are key.”

Giuliana Salinas

Giuliana Salainas is an 18-year-old first-year KCC student from Honolulu. She graduated from Moanalua High School.  

Salainas is currently pursuing her liberal arts degree and certification in the Dental Assisting program. She hopes to one day start a career as a dental hygienist. Salainas expressed that she has always wanted to work in the dental field and wants help out in the community.

In her free time, she enjoys reading books, watching movies, painting, and going for hikes around the island.

Erin Turban

Erin Turban is a 36-year-old former KCC student from ‘Ewa Beach who has begun her first semester at UH Mānoa for Fall 2019.

She originally started taking nursing classes, and one of those prerequisites was John Berestecky’s Micro 130 class. She “found it really interesting” and is now pursuing a BS in Microbiology. 

Erin enjoys hanging out at KCC.

“I love it here!” she said.

She can be found working alongside a research team investigating Campylobacter spp., a bacteria that is commonly found in poultry. 

“We are looking for a specific gene that Campy has,” she said. “It’s the type VI secretion system, the hcp gene. This gene provides cells with a needle like method of passing on its genetic information to other cells.” 

Turban got involved in research by joining the on campus organization, Kapiʻolani Association of Research in Microbiology (KARM).

“KARM has been a supportive environment,” she said. :This will for sure help me with my Microbiology degree. I get to work with the equipment and learn techniques from Becky Kanenaka [a mentor for KARM], JB [Berestecky] himself, and my lab mates.”

Jamie Lee

18-year-old Jamie Lee is a Liberal Arts major from Honolulu who has just finished his first year at KCC. Interested in anime, Lee hopes to be accepted into the Animation Department’s internship once he receives his Liberal Arts degree.

Lee works as an AVID tutor at Washington Middle School. Previously, he only tutored in its summer school program for four years while he was in high school, and now he tutors during the regular school year. The tutors help the students with work problems that they are having difficulty solving on their own in any subject.

In his spare time, Lee likes to play board games with his friends or practice his animation skills.

Chas Efhan

Chas Efhan is a 19-year-old liberal arts with a concentration in business major. As a native of Nuʻuanu, Efhan is in his sophomore year of college. He plans on transferring into UH Mānoa’s accounting program next semester.

“Today’s world is so focused around markets, businesses, and money,” Efhan said. “A lot of jobs are situated around businesses, and because of that I want to get a business degree. It’s a really versatile degree that can land me a lot of different jobs.

“Efhan’s goal is to own his own business where he manufactures and builds his own products. He loves to repair surfboards and fix anything related to fiberglass. However, Efhan believes that he will start his post-college job at a business firm.

“I think I’ll start at a business firm after Mānoa to save and invest my money so that I can buy my own company someday,” he said. “I want to build composites in the future; preferably stuff dealing with carbon-fiber, surfboards, or canoe making. Those would all be really cool. I want to create things that bring people happiness.

“Efhan’s advice to future business majors is to just love what you’re doing. He said that you must be interested in the field as a whole, and be motivated to work hard. He believes it might take a while, but you’ll get to your end goal eventually.

Alex Lum

Alex Lum describes himself as a “perpetual sophomore” attending KCC. The 42-year-old is pursuing his studies in Pre-Engineering and serves as a temporary representative for the Na Hua o Papa Club. Lum said Na Hua o Papa works to promote sustainability efforts, specifically ecological implementations onto the campus.

“Everyone has their own kind of green space culturally in the back of their minds and that’s kind of what we want to see,” Lum said. “With the loss of a lot of native ecologies, native plantscapes, we don’t have enough people with that in their mind so we have to recreate the native ecology of KCC as much as possible.”

Lum said the club recently harvested some sweet potato, a plant he said is pest resistant making it unharmful to the environment it is placed in.

In the future, Lum hopes that the campus’ only rain garden will advance to divert roof water from going into storm drains into a freshwater lens that he said should become drinkable within 50 years. 

Adam Pada

Adam Pada is a 21-year-old first-year student from Kahaluʻu. He is interested in a Computer Science degree, though he currently does not have an official major. He decided to attend Kapiʻolani Community College as Windward Community College did not have the classes he needed for that particular major.

Pada was always keen to get into the computer science field, as he loves working with computers and learning about their technology. He hopes to continue working with them once he graduates, but is unsure of his exact plans.

“I’m still trying to figure that out, though, my future,” Pada said, “Like everyone else.”

He works at Yamashiro’s Building Supply, which his family is connected to through the owner. It’s a simple job that allows him to focus mainly on his education, something that is important to him. In his free time, Pada enjoys going to the gym in order to stay in shape. There is not much spare time in his life because he prefers to concentrate on school and work.

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Voices & Views

  • Carl WheelerCarl Wheeler
    86-year-old Carl Wheeler can be found in the library as a math tutor at the study hub. Wheeler started teaching math in classrooms back in 1956; he's taught everywhere from Mid-Pacific Institute, Punahou School, and even Kapiʻolani Community College. He retired from teaching in the classroom in 1997 and started tutoring because he said he has time to do it, he can be of help, and he likes math. Wheeler chose his field of teaching when he was in junior high school and while he tried other things he was always coming back to teaching math in the end. Wheeler also provides private tutoring at $60-70 an hour, though that is rare these days, or for free if it is family or friends. While private tutoring has its benefits, he prefers tutoring at KCC as there is more variety. More students come from a variety of math courses in which he can help. "Language, what do the words mean. The meaning of words," Wheeler said. "How it helps one understand. ... I've long held the belief if one understands why a particular word is chosen for a concept one understands the concept better, and I stick that in my teaching all the time."

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